Factors that Determine Stocking of Fish in a Tropical Tank

A healthy and well-stocked tropical fish tank can add some much-needed colour and life to your home or business. However, the way you stock the tank can be tough at times. Therefore, now that you have received the fish tank and you wish to stock it, you need to consider a few aspects of the tank and the fish so that you can use the tank effectively.

Timing

It takes time for you to build a well-stocked tropical fish tank. For new tanks, adding fish too fast can lead to the death of some, or all of the fish. Fish waste contains nitrites and ammonia, which can build up quickly and kill the fish fast. The good thing is that the bacteria that break down the waste grow in the tank naturally.

However, these bacteria take some time before they start working, and you need to give it some time before you can add many fish in the tank.

So, start with just a few tropical fish from Come Into the Water, say three or four, make sure the fish is hardy so that you can test the water before you can add some more. Get a tester to test for ammonia and nitrites, and then make sure the levels drop to zero before you can add more fish.

Remember that the spike in the nitrites and ammonia will spike everytime you add new fish. So, take some time before you add fish – say, two or three weeks to establish a healthy tropical aquarium.

Selection

What kind of fish should you add to the tank?  Choose among the hardy tropical fish, it being a tropical setup. You also make a choice depending on the predicted size of the fish.

The Tank Size

You need to choose a tank that matches your aspirations. Too many fish in a tiny tank can lead to filtration problems and affect the ecosystem. If the tank is overcrowded, the natural bacteria will not be able to break down the fish waste effectively. This can cause the death of the fish, or make them sick. Another effect of overstocking the tank is that the fish will not have sufficient oxygen. Fish usually breathe oxygen that dissolves in the water. The bigger the tank, the more water you need to deliver oxygen.

The basic rule is that you provide an inch of fish for a gallon of water. Therefore, if your tank measures thirty gallons, we are looking at thirty inches of fish.